Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Ramata Diakité - Lahila Hilalah

Listen to lovely music from the Motherland . . . .

Mah Kouyaté nº2 - Maloya -

Mamou Sidibe - Mali Mousso

Getting into the African Groove . . . .   Won't you join me????

Tata Diakité - Djarabi -

Tata Diakité - Demissenw

Ramata Diakité - Lahila Hilalah

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Ruby Dee REST with the Grace of God


Ruby Dee was an American actress, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist and activist. She is perhaps best known for co-starring in the film A Raisin in the Sun and the film American Gangster
The actress was born in Cleveland, raised in Harlem, and emerged in an era when African-American women remained second-class citizens on stage and screen.

 
           Legendary stage and screen actress — and Civil Rights leader Ruby Dee dead at 91

Ruby Dee died Wednesday at her New Rochelle home with her family at her side. The actress was born in Cleveland, raised in Harlem, and emerged in an era when African-American women remained second-class citizens on stage and screen.

The 91-year-old activist and actress, who died late Wednesday, will spend eternity with her late husband — their ashes co-mingled inside an urn bearing the words, “In This Thing Together.”

 Her career as an actress paralleled her work as an activist, often done with husband Davis at her side until his death in 2005.
She and Davis were close friends with both Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, whose eulogy Davis gave in 1965 — two years after Dee delivered a stirring reading at King’s March on Washington.


In 2005, Dee and Davis received the National Civil Rights Museum’s Lifetime Achievement Freedom award. Six years earlier, both were arrested while protesting the police shooting of unarmed immigrant Amadou Diallo.
The two starred side-by-side in a pair of Spike Lee-directed films, “Do The Right Thing” and “Jungle Fever.” In all, they performed together in 11 plays and five films.

When it comes to the enduring love of Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, death will not do them part.

The 91-year-old activist and actress, who died late Wednesday, will spend eternity with her late husband — their ashes co-mingled inside an urn bearing the words, “In This Thing Together.”

Dee, the epitome of grace, courage, style and class across seven decades of stardom, was flanked by two generations of family when she passed away at 10:30 p.m. in her suburban home.

“She very peacefully surrendered,” said her daughter Nora Day, standing Thursday on the back steps of her parents’ New Rochelle house. “We hugged her, we kissed her, we gave her our permission to go.

“She opened her eyes. She looked at us. She closed her eyes, and she set sail.”

The Cleveland-born, Harlem-raised Dee emerged in an era when African-American women remained second-class citizens on stage and screen.
   
            "Ossie and Ruby"and Gill Scott -Heron


She went on to earn an Emmy, a Grammy and a Screen Actors Guild Award, along with a 2008 Oscar nomination for playing the mother to Denzel Washington’s Harlem drug kingpin in “American Gangster.”

In 1965, she became the first African-American woman to perform a leading role at the American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Conn.

The lights on Broadway will dim for 60 seconds at 7:45 p.m. Friday in her honor.

“A TRUE APOLLO LEGEND RUBY DEE 1922-2014,” read the marquee above the Apollo Theater on 125th St. in Harlem.

Dee poses with husband Ossie Davis when the pair won a Lifetime Achievment award from the Screen Actors Guild in 2001.Dee poses with husband Ossie Davis when the pair won a Lifetime Achievment award from the Screen Actors Guild in 2001.PreviousNextLifetime achievment award winners Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee pose with their award at the 7th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, Sunday, March 11, 2001, in Los Angeles.  
Her career as an actress paralleled her work as an activist, often done with husband Davis at her side until his death in 2005.

She and Davis were close friends with both Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, whose eulogy Davis gave in 1965 — two years after Dee delivered a stirring reading at King’s March on Washington.

In 2005, Dee and Davis received the National Civil Rights Museum’s Lifetime Achievement Freedom award. Six years earlier, both were arrested while protesting the police shooting of unarmed immigrant Amadou Diallo.

The two starred side-by-side in a pair of Spike Lee-directed films, “Do The
Right Thing” and “Jungl
\Dee attended 'The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross' in 2013.Dee attended 'The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross' in 2013.PreviousNextNEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 16:  Ruby Dee attends "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross" New York Series Premiere at the Paris Theater on October 16, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo by Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images)  epa04251910 (FILE) A file picture dated 24 February 2008 shows US actress Ruby Dee arriving for the 80th annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California, USA. According to media reports, the actress and civil rights activist died at the age of 91 at her home in New Rochelle, New York, on 12 June 2014.  EPA/ANDREW GOMBERT  The first casting director Sidney Poitier ever met told the African Ameerican actor he wasn’t cut out for a theatrical career. That was in 1943, when Poitier was 16.
Infuriated by what the director said, Poitier set out to prove the man was wrong. Prove it he did. For Poitier was nominated for one of the top awards in motion picture work an Oscar. Whether he will win an academy award for his role in “The Defiant Ones” won’t be known until tomorrow night (April 6). Poitier currently is the central character in a hit Broadway show, “A Raisin in the Sun.” He is seen here in one of the scenes of the play with actress Ruby Dee, who plays his wife March 26, 1959. (AP Photo)  Publicity still of actors Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis in the Broadway show 'Jeb,' 1946. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images) Enlarge
ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES
Dee’s first film role came in 1949’s musical drama “That Man of Mine.” She played Rachel Robinson in “The Jackie Robinson Story” in 1950, and co-starred opposite Nat King Cole, Eartha Kitt and Cab Calloway in “St. Louis Blues” in1958.

She appeared in the 1979 TV movie “Roots: The Next Generations,” and co-starred with Davis in their own short-lived 1980-81 show, “Ossie and Ruby!”

Dee was a frequent presence on New York stages for four decades, joining the American Negro Theatre in 1941 and making her Broadway debut two years later in “South Pacific.”

She starred opposite Davis in the 1946 play “Jeb,” and the two were wed in 1948.

Sheryl Lee Ralph praises Dee in a tweet.Sheryl Lee Ralph praises Dee in a tweet.PreviousNext  Tributes to Ruby Dee pour in on Twitter.  Tributes to Ruby Dee pour in on Twitter.  Tributes to Ruby Dee pour in on Twitter. Enlarge
In 1959, Dee starred in the Broadway premiere of “A Raisin in the Sun” as the wife of Sidney Poitier — and she reprised the role in the film eight years later.

Dee’s last Broadway performance was in the 1988 comedy “Checkmates,” which marked the debut of Washington.

The Oscar-winning actor is on the boards in Poitier’s role in “A Raisin in the Sun.”

Dee’s résumé of activism included membership in organizations including the Congress of Racial Equality, the NAACP, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Though born Ruby Wallace, she kept her married surname even after divorcing her first husband, blues singer Frankie Dee, in the 1940s.

She and Davis collaborated for decades on art, activism and family. The duo has three children: blues musician Guy Davis, and two daughters, Nora Day and Hasna Muhammad.

All three, along with Dee’s seven grandchildren, were with the actress when she died.

“She’s off to her next gig,” said grandson Jihaad Muhammad, 32.

The couple raised eyebrows with an autobiography that advocated open marriage, saying that lies, not extramarital affairs, destroy marriages. The book was published in 1998, when the pair celebrated its 50th anniversary — a feat they self-deprecatingly credited “as much to luck as to love.”

A documentary on the couple’s trailblazing life and career, “Life’s Essentials with Ruby Dee,” debuts June 22 at the 18th Annual American Black Film Festival in Chelsea. It was directed by Dee and Davis’ grandson Muta’Ali.


               Four of Ruby Dee's best-known film roles


                 Ruby Dee - Tupac on Def Jam Poetry


                 Ruby Dee: A Beautiful Spirit - ESSENCE


                      Ruby Dee on the Civil Rights movement -


               The Somebodiness Of Me - Ruby Dee




Sunday, June 8, 2014

Michelle Obama Emotional Speech at Maya Angelou Memorial Service



Jun 7, 2014
First lady Michelle Obama speakes Saturday at a private memorial service for poet and author Maya Angelou, the White House said.
The service takes at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., where Angelou first began teaching in 1982.
Angelou, who died last week at age 86, was a favorite of the Obamas. President Obama praised her as a "brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman." The president's sister, Maya Soetoro-Ng, was named for Angelou.
Although Angelou supported Hillary Rodham Clinton in the 2008 Democratic primaries, she later endorsed Barack Obama. In a 2009 essay in Essence magazine, Angelou recounted how she sought advice from Oprah Winfrey before introducing the Obamas at an event and praised Michelle Obama for her "effortless grace."

Wake Forest University says there will be other celebrations of Angelou's life in other cities. Her son, Guy Johnson, will release that information at a later date.

Friday, May 30, 2014

Dr. Maya Angelou - Love Liberates

by Dr. Maya Angelou
 When I say... "I am a Christian"
 I'm not shouting "I'm clean livin'."
 I'm whispering "I was lost,
Now I'm found and forgiven."

 When I say... "I am a Christian"
 I don't speak of this with pride.
 I'm confessing that I stumble and need Christ to be my guide.

 When I say... "I am a Christian"
I'm not trying to be strong.
 I'm professing that I'm weak And need His strength to carry on.
 When I say... "I am a Christian"
 I'm not bragging of success.
 I'm admitting I have failed And need God to clean my mess.

 When I say... "I am a Christian"
 I'm not claiming to be perfect,
My flaws are far too visible But, God believes I am worth it.

 When I say... "I am a Christian"
 I still feel the sting of pain.
 I have my share of heartaches So I call upon His name.
 When I say... "I am a Christian"
 I'm not holier than thou, I'm just a simple sinner
 Who received God's good grace, somehow!

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Detroit Academy Choir at Wayne State's MLK Tribute

Pharrell Williams and Detroit Academy Is Happy - Ellen Show April 10, 2014

This is an amazingly fantastic and inspiring video about young children at a Detroit Charter school singing Pharell Williams' "Happy" in complete animation and joy throughout.  This video will make your day.  Enjoy and smile for the next 24 hours.







Reject & Protect



                    Reject &  Protect: Opening Ceremony

On April 22nd, 2014, the Cowboy Indian Alliance rode into Washington, DC, set up eight tipis on the National Mall, blessed the encampment, and settled in for a week of resistance and protest against the Keystone XL pipeline. More on the Reject & Protect mobilization here: http://rejectandprotect.org/ The Cowboy Indian Alliance is just that: an alliance of midwestern ranchers and tribal communities from along the pipeline's route that has come together to reject KXL and protect their families, homes, and sacred lands. Rep. Raul Grijalva stands with the Cowboy Indian Alliance



                              Reject and Protect Day 1


Idle No More stands in solidarity with the mass mobilization Reject and Protect happening in Washington, Deceit, as well as the Moccasins on the Ground blockade training in Red Shirt, South Dakota, and the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Woman Pipe Spiritual Encampment in Green Grass, South Dakota, and recognizes the words of Protect the Sacred spokesperson, Faith Spotted Eagle, "These three encampments represent the physical, spiritual, and political manifestations of our movement." Earth Day Reject and Protect by Saying #NoKXL: Women's Center Tipis Ceremony




Tribes of the Sioux Nation and many others join ranchers in Washington, D.C. to tell President Obama that their lands may not be used for the TransCanada Tarsands XL Pipeline. There are grave environmental concerns with the aquifer if there were a leak to the pipeline. As witnessed in Mayflower, Michigan, these cleanups are not much more than sweeping the problem under the rug and the local communities pay the impact to the environment. On Day 1 of the Reject and Protect Cowboy Indian Alliance it is explained that the tradition is to have the women erect the center tipis with 3 poles representing the tradition of unity in the Sioux Nation. Each pole represents the Lakota, Dakota, & Nakota. What had been historic about today's
ceremony, the women ranchers had been invited to work w/ the tribe's women to put up the 'center tipis' on the National Mall in D.C. 4.22.14 More information: www.DCMediaGroup.us www.RejectandProtect.org www.BoldNebraska.org www.SierraClub.org www.350.org http://www.legendsofamerica.com/na-si...

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Michael Jackson MTV Best Performance Complete Video



Michael Jackson at another awards ceremony nearly 20 years ago.  Same magnificence!  Same verve!  Same electricity!  Truly incredible!